Don’t Call Me a Headhunter

11/02/2012 04.13 EST

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Headhunter. The definition of a “headhunter” is someone who seeks, collects and preserves the heads of enemies as trophies or ceremonial objects. This is not what I do and I certainly hope it’s not something my competitors do.   Whenever I attend an event and meet people for the first time, most ask me what I do for a living. They are confused when I respond that I am an “executive search consultant.” Most of the time, I receive glazed looks in response to this term and almost always need to follow it with a more detailed description: “I am hired or retained by corporations to help them recruit for specific executive-level positions.” This is typically followed by more confusion until I give in and say I am a headhunter. Then the vacant stare shifts into clear recognition – “Oh, now I understand what you do!” – followed by a description of their job-seeking friend “Joe” and why he’d be perfect for my client. Now I am just frustrated. That is not what I do either.   While referrals are welcome, I wish people would understand the core differences between executive search and headhunting:   We work with clients on very specific assignments. Even though “Joe” may be a great guy, if I don’t have a search assignment that matches his background, it doesn’t matter. We are not a placement agency. We are a consulting firm that partners with companies to identify talented executives who have the...

How’s the Job Market?

08/08/2012 03.51 EST

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Being an executive search consultant brings with it a variety of occupational hazards.  When people discover my profession, they immediately work the word “headhunter” into the conversation and then apologize to me in case I’m insulted by it (I’m not, but I don’t embrace it).  Or they send me copies of resumes from friends and family members who are out of work so I can find them jobs (not what we do).  Or they tell me they have been thinking about “making a move” and ask if I will meet with them to help.   But the biggest occupational hazard in my profession is having a snappy, relevant, current answer to a question I get many times each week:   “How’s the job market?”   People ask this question with the expectation that there is one discrete answer.  It turns out there is one answer, but it isn’t the answer people want to hear.  Because the real answer is this – “It depends.”   First of all, it depends on where you want to live and how much money you want to make.  Secondly, it depends on your skills and the demand for those skills.  It also depends on how up-to-date those skills are.  Could you write an article for a business publication about where your profession is going in the next five years – or would you be more likely to write about how your profession has lost its way and will never be as good...