How Are You Preparing for Your Next Interview?

08/31/2011 10.53 EST

...

I coach many candidates before they interview for a position.  I do it as part of my role at Salveson Stetson Group and as a favor to help others, and, frankly, I just enjoy doing it.  I often find that candidates are underprepared for an interview and are essentially “winging it.”  But sometimes, it’s the opposite – candidates are over-prepared to the point that their presentation can seem canned or even insincere.  If you are coaching others on the job hunt or you, yourself, are interviewing, I’ve outlined a few suggestions that may be helpful.  Some of this information is common sense but worth mentioning:    Do your homework before your meeting.  Does the hiring executive have a profile on LinkedIn?  Review the company website, gather information from news sites and talk to others who have worked for the company in the past. Make a strong first impression.  Smile, make eye contact and firmly shake the person’s hand.  I know this is something that your mother and father have told you time and time again – but it really is important! Turn off your cell phone, completely.  Don’t put it on vibrate. There is nothing more irritating than to have someone’s cell phone ring or vibrate during an interview.  It is distracting and sends the message that you are not fully engaged in the conversation. Come prepared with specific examples of accomplishments that relate to the needs for the role.  You should be able to provide a...

Shorthand Notes: What Your Job Interview Says About You

05/31/2011 02.42 EST

...

As a retained search consultant, I spend a lot of my time interviewing executives. Sometimes I am speaking with general managers; other times it’s with HR executives, sales leaders or financial executives. They may be in my office, sitting with me in an airport, in a restaurant or on my computer screen. I haven’t done the math, but I’m sure I have interviewed well over a thousand people in the past 15 years.Interviews are funny things. I believe that putting people at ease allows me to have the best chance of seeing someone’s true personality – but I also have to ask challenging and, at times, sensitive questions. Sometimes I am very direct in my questioning and other times I ask much more open ended, almost vague questions. It all depends on the search, the candidate, the company culture and the situation. People being people, executives bring their own agendas, expectations and hopes to the interview. Sometimes they are anxious, sometimes too relaxed. Some are over-the-top enthusiastic and others are sleepy. I’ve come to learn that I should expect pretty much anything to come out in an interview.But despite the wide variations I find in interviews, there are a few things I see so often that I have developed shorthand notes for myself to document them. Unfortunately, they describe interview styles or executive characteristics that are not very positive. In the spirit of sharing my observations for the benefit of all, here are my top three: TTM:...