New Year, New Opportunities:
How to Prepare for a Job Search in 2018

12/18/2017 02.41 EDT

Looking for a new job can be a difficult process. The key is to remain positive and focused. Remember that all of your hard work could result in the start of the next chapter in your career, and an exciting beginning to 2018!
New Year, New Opportunities: <br />How to Prepare for a Job Search in 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it is a common time for people to reflect on the past 12 months and start planning for the new year. As a result of this soul searching, many decide it may be time to take the next step in their careers and jump back into the job market.

Focus on networking, connecting with search firms and applying to jobs online. Spend most of your time networking instead of online job applications, where your resume is likely to get lost in the shuffle. Many roles are filled through networks instead of online postings, so building your referral base is critical for a successful job search....

Parents’ Guide to Helping Their Child Find a Job

05/27/2015 10.42 EDT

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Salveson Stetson Group hosts an annual College Seminar for our clients to support their family members who will be graduating from college.  At this seminar, we focus on providing advice to students on how to effectively look for a job.  In addition, we spend time with parents and discuss how they can best support their children.   It has been a very successful and well attended event each year.  As you can imagine, many parents have greatly encouraged their children to attend with the hopes that our advice will land their child that elusive first job.   We have to navigate through a sensitive path with parents at the College Seminar.  First and foremost, they are our clients.  We want to help them, but also ease their anxieties about their children.  Some are frustrated, as they don’t believe their child has been active enough in the job market.  Others are concerned that their child seems aimless with little direction regarding what they intend to do with their life.  Some parents are ready to have their children “off the payroll” and actively participating in the world of work and want to ensure they are able to find the best job for themselves.  Bottom line – we see it all.   One interesting aspect of the College Seminar program is allowing parents to vent their concerns, hopes and dreams for their child, along with their frustrations.  Naturally, it becomes a supportive environment where parents learn from one another.  Here...

Five Steps Every College Graduate Should Take to Find and Land a Job

06/12/2012 03.27 EDT

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This is the month for college graduations, and after the celebrations are over, roughly two million new alumni will be out in the “real world.” Although it is quite an exciting time in the lives of these students, it has also become a time of great anxiety. Students and their parents worry about the job market and which potential opportunities may be available. Many students leave college with a great deal of debt and, as a result, are even more nervous about finding the right job to not only lead them on a positive career path but also put them on stronger financial footing. The job market has been challenging for new graduates overall in the past few years, but there are some hopeful signs as it appears the market has slightly improved for the class of 2012.  The National Association of Colleges and Employers recently surveyed employers and found that companies expect to hire 29,237 new graduates this year, a 10.2% improvement from the hiring of 26,529 college graduates from the class of 2011.   Although the market is still not robust and needs to improve, many students are completely unprepared to conduct an effective job search. Making the process even more difficult, this year’s graduates face competition from 2011 grads who are still seeking a job in their field. Many students have not taken advantage of the career services offerings on campus and have become reliant on applying for jobs online. Unfortunately, their resumes become...

Seven Ways to Land a New Job in 2012

01/04/2012 04.51 EDT

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I know.  We always start out the New Year with a resolution and try hard to stick with it.  Most times, we stray from our goal.  Whether it is fitting more exercise in our daily routine or spending more quality time with our family – we always have good intentions.  Our busy lives just get in the way.   As an executive search consultant, I receive a sizeable number of calls at the beginning of the year from candidates expressing interest in changing jobs.  Finding a new position becomes their New Year’s resolution.  Some individuals are blocked from a promotion, interested in a new challenge or just feeling unappreciated.  My colleagues and I try to make the time to spend a few minutes listening.  Typically, job seekers describe the kind of role and industry sector that interests them.   Conducting a job search can be loaded with several emotions that may sometimes cloud a person’s thoughts about how to start a search as well as how to manage one.   So if one of your New Year’s resolutions is to find a new job but you are not sure how to get started, these suggestions may help guide you:   Have you exhausted all options within your current company?  Have you made your career interests known to your boss and other colleagues so they may have you in mind as new opportunities emerge? In addition to updating your resume, put together a list of target companies.  This list...

Do the Right Thing: Why Helping Always Pays Off

10/17/2011 04.32 EDT

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How many times a week do you receive a call or email from someone who is out of work and looking for a job?  Do you respond to those messages or do you purposefully ignore them because you are too busy?  I know all of us who are fortunate enough to be working are likely to be performing more than one job.  Frankly, all of us are thinly stretched and our daily schedules can be overwhelming.   Let me tell you why I think it is important to answer that call or email.  First of all, it is the right thing to do.  Secondly, all of us may find ourselves in that same place at some time in the future – looking for our next job and hopeful that others are willing to talk to us.   Believe me, there are days when I feel overwhelmed and don’t have one minute to devote to talking to someone who is looking for a position.  However, whenever I do take the time for the conversation, I always feel it was worthwhile.  I hopefully gave them a new resource, job search strategy or direction to approach in their job search efforts.  In return, I usually gain some interesting, new perspective about the market.  At the same time, I’ve added someone new to my network.  Basically, I feel energized afterwards and in retrospect, I am glad I made the time.   When you do make the time to help someone network,...

Don’t Be “That Guy”

08/24/2011 12.59 EDT

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As you might imagine, I get many calls and emails from people looking for jobs.  I do my best to keep up with them and help where I can.  On rare occasions where serendipity intervenes, the job seeker actually is a good fit for a current assignment.  However, most of the time, I can only help in terms of advice or networking support, both of which I am more than happy to do.  I reserve Friday mornings for any job seeker who can get on my calendar.  It’s the right thing to do, particularly in this economy.   Service providers are great sources of information and referrals for job seekers.   We are in the market on a daily basis and, as part of our responsibilities, we do our best to keep current.  Lawyers, accountants, insurance brokers, human resources consultants, etc. – our book and trade is in knowing what changes are afoot before anyone else does.  By and large, this community is the job seeker’s friend.  While there is no immediate payoff for the service provider, the good ones know that lending a hand is not only the right thing to do, but a great long-term business development strategy.  Most job seekers remember this help and are eager to maintain these relationships after they’ve successfully concluded their job searches.  However, there is a small minority that doesn’t.  If I can offer any executive just one piece of career advice, it would be “don’t be that guy.”  ...

Interviewing Star Candidates

07/06/2011 02.40 EDT

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Given the number of interviews I do on a weekly basis, it’s easy for them to blend together.  Not that I get candidates mixed up with one another; I take good notes and do my best to be focused in every interaction.  But it’s hard for a candidate to stand out in a calendar that may contain 15 to 20 interviews, but the “stars” do.   In my opinion, what differentiates stars in an interview setting is their ability to engage their interviewer.  Typically, they are focused and succinctly describe their strengths. Accomplishments are linked to results.  They have an engaging style and as a result, I rarely look at my watch or even wonder what time it is – the conversation flows naturally.   This notion of brevity is worthwhile for every executive-level candidate to consider.  The human attention span is short, even under the best of circumstances.  The more concise you can be in an interview while still driving your point home, the more likely you will be to engage the person on the other side of the table.  I find that star candidates have the ability to provide specific examples that sound more like short stories than novels.  The novelists, on the other hand, often lose track of the questions they’re in the middle of answering, as do those asking the questions.   Other distinguishing traits include bringing a focused energy to the conversation and an observable passion for one’s work.  These qualities shine...

Advice for College Graduates

06/08/2011 09.00 EDT

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“O brave new world! That hath such people in it!” … but where are all the jobs? Graduating from college is an exciting and anxious time for student and parent alike. Most students are thrilled to be relieved from the academic rigor but sad to depart from four years of a robust social life and friendships they have formed along the way. Parents look forward to seeing their child take this next step in his or her life, but are perhaps a bit perturbed that their newly minted graduate only half-listened when given the “you really need to be looking for a job” speech six to nine months ago. First, some good news. Many college graduates have already started their job searches, and due to the fact that employers are actively recruiting on campuses again and hiring is up 19.3% for 2011 grads, some have secured new jobs. This alone puts them ahead of the Classes of 2009 and 2010 who missed their window for campus recruitment due to the recession. However, a good percentage of this year’s graduating class is still on the hunt. Perhaps they didn’t focus on their job searches or were not as savvy on the best way to look for opportunities. Maybe they made the brave choice of majoring in English or Anthropology, majors for which most college career counseling offices are embarrassingly ill equipped to assist. For whatever reason, they are unemployed, on the hunt, and most likely living back in...

The Candidate Experience

05/25/2011 08.58 EDT

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I am often asked to speak at events where my audience is comprised mainly of executives in transition. Sometimes these are employed professionals seeking better opportunities, but the majority of these individuals are, for one reason or another, unemployed. Invariably, at some point in the conversation, I feel the need to apologize for the way they are often treated by people in my profession. From the candidate perspective, working with retained executive search firms can be a frustrating process. I hear stories of candidates never getting feedback on interviews, communication that is intermittent at best, and a general sense that the individual is a commodity – and these stories are from the candidates who are actively working with a search firm on a real opportunity. For those who are trying to build a relationship within executive search, the stories are even bleaker. I haven’t done any grand research on the topic, but the general consensus I have gathered is that the executive search profession on the whole just doesn’t treat people very well; and in my mind, beyond the fact that its bad behavior, it’s also just plain bad for business. We are extensions of our clients. How I treat a potential candidate will have a direct impact on that person’s perception of the company I represent. And, whether that executive ends up being a bona fide candidate for the position I am seeking to fill, they will remain a potential customer or business partner for my...