Tips for Recruiters Looking to Recruit Out-of-Town Job Candidates

06/24/2013 02.07 EDT

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This article was originally published on Brazen Life, a lifestyle and career blog for ambitious young professionals.     Your CFO job is in Chicago, but your top candidate is in Atlanta. She has a child who’s a sophomore in high school, and her mortgage is $200,000 underwater. She loves your company and the career opportunity, but can’t get herself over the relocation hurdle.   Sound familiar? Unfortunately, for many recruiters, it’s an all too familiar scenario as they go to market for top talent. Seventy-six percent of employers surveyed last year reported that relocation is still an issue for candidates. Moving for a job can be a tough sell—so how do you turn a “no” into a “yes” with a rockstar candidate when relocation is the only thing standing in your way?   It’s not completely hopeless. Last year, 44 percent of workers said they’d relocate for the right job, and data from 2011 reports that interstate residential shipments were up significantly from the recession, suggesting Americans might be more open to moving for out-of-state jobs. Plus, general job satisfaction remains low, with the majority of employees in the U.S. and Canada unhappy at work.   Despite these encouraging trends, a rigid approach on your company’s part will not put you fully in the game for relocating top talent. In order to successfully compete, your company needs to look at each case individually, rather than trying to fit every candidate into your standard relocation policy.   Candidate objections...

Does Soup Come With The Sandwich?

06/17/2013 12.05 EDT

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I joined the “Sandwich Generation” in my early 40s when, within a month’s time, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and my father suffered two major strokes. I’m happy to report that almost six years later, they are both still with us, after another bout of cancer for my mom – kidney this time – and my dad dealing with the challenges of living with Alzheimer’s. However, I really wasn’t prepared to assume the role of primary caregiver for my parents while concurrently managing a business, a marriage, and all the joys and pains of raising two teenage daughters.   After visiting with my dad last night, watching him continue his long and losing battle with Alzheimer’s; it made me remember something I wrote about him a few years ago. This isn’t a “how to” on successfully managing the challenges of intergenerational family issues, but hopefully a reminder that we sometimes need to take a step back and put our day jobs in perspective…   January 27, 2009 I miss talking with my dad. He had two strokes towards the end of 2007, which has severely limited his ability to speak. He gets lost in a sentence or comes to a point where he can’t recall a word or name. You can see the frustration on his face. He refuses to answer the phone when someone calls the house and tries to limit himself to one or two word answers when he can.   My father...

Reverse Mentoring

05/20/2013 08.50 EDT

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I attend the HRPS Global Conference every year and there are always one or two presentations that have great nuggets of information.  The presentation by Debi Hirshlag from Workday was one of those presentations.   Debi discussed the future of work and talked about Bob Johansen’s “Ten Leadership Skills for the Future.”  While all of these future skills were interesting, the one that resonated most with me was “immersive learning ability.”  This is essentially the ability to immerse yourself in an unfamiliar environment and learn from it in a first-person way.  What does this mean, exactly?  In other words, how do you adapt to new working environments as well as learn new technologies or novel approaches to your work?  Instead of just reading about them, how do you really learn them?   I have a good example: Social Media.  Several years ago, our colleagues at Buchanan Public Relations introduced us to social media.  We had already been fairly entrenched in using LinkedIn but none of us had touched Twitter.  With their help, we dove into this unknown world.  It was like learning a new language!  How do you say anything substantial when it is limited to 140 characters?  What in the world is a hashtag?!  Kathleen McFadden at Buchanan PR, who is much younger and wiser, slowly but surely taught me how to use Twitter and, in turn, demonstrated how to build my personal and professional brand.  Debi Hirshlag calls this process “reverse mentoring” – learning new...

To Those of You Who Are Shirtless on LinkedIn

05/06/2013 10.45 EDT

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College students learned years ago that they should be careful when choosing which photos they include on their Facebook pages.  Drunk at a frat party?  Probably not.  Helping poor kids learn how to read in an inner-city church?  Bingo.   So it doesn’t seem unreasonable to expect that a mid-career grown-up might exercise a bit of judgment when selecting the photo to use for their LinkedIn profile.  After all, the site’s tagline is “The World’s Largest Professional Network.”   Our firm holds an annual seminar for soon-to-be college graduates to help them figure out how to conduct an effective job search.  We do it as a nice gesture to our clients who wring their hands at this time of year, wondering how they are going to get junior off the payroll.   Every year, we place more emphasis on the power of LinkedIn, advising these new grads to have a substantial profile on the site.  With the National Association of Colleges and Employers recently reporting that employers expect their level of new-grad hires to remain flat, those entering the workforce can better market themselves with a fully optimized, professional-looking profile.   In order to give these new grads examples of profile photo do’s and don’ts, we logged into our own accounts to survey our connections’ pictures in hopes of finding some questionable choices.  It turned out to be easier – and more surprising – than we’d anticipated.   First of all, we stopped counting the number of...

If a Tree Falls in the Forest…

04/15/2013 10.43 EDT

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For the past month (at least), I have been harassed daily (at least) by my colleague who is responsible for posting blog entries on our website.  Her job is not to write them – even though she has about 30 IQ points on me.  Instead, her job is to annoy me, occasionally with good humor, to be sure we regularly post interesting blogs related to our firm and the world of talent acquisition.   It wasn’t her idea to bug me; we asked her to do this.  It’s part of her job.  But she does embrace it with more passion and relish than anything else she does here.   But that’s not what I want to write about.  I want to write about why she has had to bug me for a month.  Sure, it takes time to write and I am constantly swamped.  It also requires that I come up with interesting topics – easier some days than others.   But I’m starting to think the reason I’ve been dragging my feet is because I don’t think anyone reads what I write.   Blogs are supposed to be one of the central social media marketing strategies for firms like ours who are trying to get noticed without spending tons of money on advertising.  We like that the blogs give us a chance to sound like the experts we are, maybe educate people along the way, and create a positive, attractive brand presence in our field.  Plus...

The Rules of Engagement

03/01/2013 01.44 EDT

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This article originally ran on TLNT.  To view it, click here.   Let’s face it.  The active candidate has become a second-class citizen.  Conventional wisdom says that there continues to be a glut of in-transition executives in the job market.  Just post a job on Monster.com and you can expect an avalanche of resumes to bury your inbox.  Or, set your corporate recruiter loose on LinkedIn and within a few days, she will be sitting in your office with a stack of profiles from which you can choose your next VP of [insert job title here].  The only catch is that the vast majority of these candidates are either out of work or have something going on in their current companies that is pushing them out the door.   That’s not to say there are not a number of talented executives in the active candidate pile.  There are.  You can’t have the type of economic upheaval we have experienced over the past several years and not some very talented professionals be displaced.  But, do you really want this demographic to make up the entire applicant pool for a critical senior hire?  That answer comes down to making a choice between whether you are looking for the best talent available or the best talent period.   In my opinion, this is where the talent acquisition function is currently failing its client base.  Many have mistaken the increase in candidate visibility for an increase in candidate quality.  That’s simply not the...

The Leadership Skills Companies Want

02/12/2013 03.34 EDT

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In this year’s Women on Boards report, Philadelphia’s Forum of Executive Women found that while board seats at companies across the region actually dropped, the portion of board seats held by women have increased by nine percent since 2006.  Over the same time period, the number of top executives who are women jumped by 25 percent.   While the progress for female leaders across the country is slow, there is a growing business case for change.  At Salveson Stetson Group, where we place executives in senior-level roles at corporations and non-profits, a number of our clients have expressed interest in hiring more women into senior leadership positions to diversify their talent pool.   What are companies looking for when they are targeting leadership hires, specifically women?   As an executive search consultant, I hear a common “wish list” when identifying talented female leaders.  First and foremost, candidates need to have a proven track record in managing large, multi-site and global teams.  Secondly, they need to have strong talent management skills as well as possess the necessary emotional intelligence to effectively navigate in their roles.  The ability for a leader to juggle all of these responsibilities across a company is a tall order.   Many emerging female leaders continually ask for advice on ways to accelerate their development.  I have highlighted several recommendations that may facilitate being considered for future executive leadership roles:   Take on a stretch assignment.  If your boss is suggesting you move into a...

4 Ways Companies Can Fix Succession Planning in 2013

01/29/2013 04.15 EDT

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Succession planning is a bit like flossing your teeth or going on a New Year’s diet – you know it is a good idea and that it can only make you healthier, but it is difficult to muster the discipline necessary to follow through on the commitment.   Most companies take a similar approach toward building a succession plan – or not building one.  The majority of organizations today lack an adequate pool of internal candidates ready to replace the executives who are slated to be promoted to the next management level or retire.  By first addressing the shortfall they have of candidates for key positions in the organization, companies can then begin to develop a comprehensive succession plan.   To stick to that New Year’s resolution of finally mapping out your organization’s successors, follow these four simple steps to get started.   Find out who cares about succession planning.  If the Board, the CEO or division leaders don’t care about succession planning, don’t waste your time trying to drive a program.  If you want to get them interested, remind them of some spectacular successes (or failures) in succession planning that had a real effect on the company.  If they still aren’t interested, update your resume and start looking for a new job. Conduct a “succession audit.”  Don’t panic – this does not have to be a big deal.  For each critical position in the organization, identify two types of employees who are already on staff: those...

What I Learned on My Trip to Thailand and Vietnam (Part 2)

12/12/2012 02.00 EDT

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You may have read the latest blog post from my business partner, John Salveson: What I Learned in Bangkok (Part 1). We traveled to Bangkok in October for the annual meeting of IIC Partners, a group of independent executive search firms across 39 countries. This gathering provided us with an opportunity to better understand global business issues, share common practices and learn from one another.   John gave several interesting – and humorous – reflections on our trip in his blog entry. I thought I’d give a bit of a different perspective. Since I last traveled to Bangkok more than 20 years ago, some things have changed dramatically and others have stayed relatively the same.   What has changed? The city has grown and the infrastructure has expanded – there is a more complex and paved highway system today than two decades prior. But because of this, traffic has become so congested that it’s challenging to navigate the city except via its waterways.   What has stayed the same? The people continue to be gentle, kind and generally happy – you can tell their sense of joy just by looking at their faces. They are incredibly friendly and have a wonderful sense of humor. If you smile first, they will smile even more broadly. They are simply happy, regardless of their financial circumstances. It was a breath of fresh air.   After visiting Bangkok, my husband and I traveled on to Ho Chi Minh City – or...

What I Learned in Bangkok (Part 1)

11/26/2012 10.19 EDT

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  A few weeks ago, my partner Sally Stetson and I spent a week in Bangkok, Thailand attending the annual meeting of IIC Partners.  Our firm is a member of this global network of independently owned retained search firms and this meeting is devoted to sharing best practices, developing relationships with each other and generally working together to strengthen our businesses.  We also do things like elect new board members and select board leadership.   Attending the meeting with us were about 70 colleagues, all of whom own and operate retained executive search firms.  They come from virtually every part of the globe: Europe, the UK, Asia, Africa, New Zealand, Australia – you name it.   For those who couldn’t join Sally and me in Bangkok, the following are 18 takeaways from our international trip.  What have you experienced in your overseas travels – in Bangkok or elsewhere?   It is a bad idea to eat a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder with Cheese after getting off a 15-hour flight over the North Pole. Pepto-Bismol is the staff of life but is unavailable anywhere in Asia. (It is very good to have experienced traveling companions with you who pack lots of Pepto.) The airports I travelled through in Hong Kong and Thailand were huge, spotless, beautiful, new and comfortable. If I lived in Hong Kong, I would go to the airport on Friday nights for fun. JFK International Airport in New York is cramped, dirty, ugly, old and inconvenient....